Woodwind
Clarinet Fingering Chart
How to Maintain a Flute
Basic Flute Fingering Chart
Oboe
Saxophones

Clarinet Fingering Chart

Clarinet Fingering

How To Maintain A Flute

Moisture collected inside the flute after each playing session must be cleaned and removed. Take a soft cleaning cloth and pull it through the slit of your cleaning rod. Carefully push the rod through the body piece of your instrument, twisting the rod as you go so that the metal rod does not come into contact with the inside of your flute. Do the same for the headjoint and footjoint.

Never use any silver polishes on your instrument. Polishes strip precious silver from the surface of your flute, ruin your keypads and can badly damage the metal of your key system. Gently wipe down your flute with a soft cloth before and after playing. A clean mouth (rinse with water even after brushing to keep toothpaste residue out of the flute) will prevent discoloration of your flute - inside and out - as well as keep food particles from building up in keys.

If you have sticky pads, take a sheet of cigarette paper and place it beneath the sticky key. Gently push down, but with a little more pressure than when you play the keys. The idea is to wick the moisture out of the pad with the paper. Repeat as necessary, but be careful not to push down too hard or your pad may be worn. Prevent sticking keys by always rinsing your mouth with water before playing.

Donít forget to wipe the tenons (the places where your flute joints fit together) of your flute regularly. They accumulate grease and dirt, which make it difficult to connect the joints of your flute. The headjoint is particularly important to clean, as it is the weakest joint and can be easily damaged if forced into a sticky joint.

The embouchure hole of your headjoint should be cleaned regularly, and if you have an open-holed flute, remember to clean the holes of your keys. Particles can build up in these places and can easily be cleaned with a Q-tip; carefully push down the key and swipe with the Q-tip. Stubborn spots should still be approached gently, but to help, dampen (not soak!) the Q-tip slightly in rubbing alcohol. Use only the rubbing alcohol, not water or other forms of alcohol, including aftershave, as they will damage the keypads.

Damage Prevention

Basic Flute Fingering Chart

This chart provides you with the basic fingerings for all the notes on the flute. Print out the illustrations if you want a handy reference during your music making!

Flute Fingering

Flute Fingering

Oboe

The oboe is related to the English horn and is descended from the horn shepherds used for thousands of years. The pitch falls in between that of the flute and the English horn, and it is tuned in the key of C.

The oboe is a double reed instrument with eight keys and a range of a little over three octaves. Oboes are usually made of wood and the type of wood dictates the colour - black, red or brown. Plastic oboes can be purchased, but donít produce the tone that a wooden one does.

Saxophones

There are several sizes in saxophones. The most commonly used is the Alto Saxophone in Eb. The smaller Soprano Saxophone comes in two shapes, bent and straight and is in the key of Bb, like a clarinet. The Tenor Saxophone is also in Bb and has a more mellow sound. Next comes the Baritone Saxophone which is very large and is in the key of Eb.

No matter which saxophone you choose to play, the fingering is all the same.

The saxophone was invented by and named for Antoine-Joseph (Adolphe) Sax. He was an expert instrument maker and talented musician. The saxophone was patented on March 20, 1846.
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